Guest Post: Batwoman: Three Authors; Three Kinds of Queer Experience

dcwomenkickingass:

Last week I made a comment about being by what the the current Batwoman writer Marc Andreyko said in an interview about DADT as part of Kate’s story. Andreyko later stopped by the blog to clarify things. I also received some input on my comment from a reader of the blog, Moira Phippen, which turned into a short discussion on where Batwoman was a character and her thoughts on Andreyko as a writer. I was so taken with her insights that I asked her to expand on them in a guest post. Here she discusses the three different authors that Kate Kane has had and their differing approaches to the character’s queer identity. Her thoughts follow and I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

I found Kate Kane just around the time of my life that I was beginning to come out, to my friends, family, community, partners, and even to myself. As a character, she is so crucial to me. Seeing a queer-identifying character take on the “Bat” name, and not just a girl, but as a “woman,” self-assured, confident, aware of herself and who she was… I can’t express how much an image like her was meaningful to me as a young adult coming to terms with a conclusion about her sexuality that she had tried her very best to avoid. No matter the writer, Kate has always embraced who she is, no apologies offered. Rucka, Williams, and now Andreyko have become some of my most treasured authors due to the care each have taken with Kate.

As I have grown older, I’ve embarked on my own path to being more like Kate: I try to be brave like her, bold like her, uncompromising like her. My relationship with each writer’s Kate - because they are, all of them, different Kates - has developed with me. In a way, they each represent different kinds of interpretations and portrayals of the queer experience and identity, all of which hold some unique and different value or impact. 

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Thanks to both of you for publishing this. It is really important to me (and others) to be able to see an issue in a medium we love from another angle. It is easy for me to see a gay character or a POC character or even a non sexualized woman character in a comic and say”look how far we’ve come.” But this shows me how little I understand an issue. So thank you.

Monkey in repose.

Monkey in repose.

Tags: monkey

"Bad books on writing tell you to ‘WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW’, a solemn and totally false adage that is the reason there exist so many mediocre novels about English professors contemplating adultery."

— Joe Haldeman (via maxkirin)

(via sarkos)

(Source: part2of3, via hallublin)

xxgeekpr0nxx:

Rocket Shot First by Scott Blair.


I murdered you (under the table)

xxgeekpr0nxx:

Rocket Shot First by Scott Blair.

I murdered you (under the table)

(via sarkos)

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.
(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

*throws money at Hollywood*

everythingsbetterwithbisexuals:

lucymontero:

lexkixass:

mooglemisbehaving:

gogogadgetgoatkins:

Mary Bowser, former slave of the Van Lew family, infiltrated the Confederacy by working as a servant in the household of Jefferson Davis. Bowser was assumed to be illiterate, and as a black woman was below suspicion. Practically invisible, she was able to listen to conversations between Confederate officials and read sensitive documents, gathering information that she handed over to the Union.

(From National Woman’s History Museum Facebook Page)

This needs to be a movie. Like, now.

I’d watch this movie.

How is this not a movie?

*throws money at Hollywood*

(via language-escapes)

Dear Inverse World, All Is Forgiven

dungeon-elementary:

So I backed Inverse World. I wasn’t 100% on board with the idea, didn’t quite fathom how it meshed with Dungeon World’s core goals and system paradigm, etc. But damn, all my pretentious quibbles are out the window the minute that five ten-year-olds jack an airship and immediately cover it with ballistas.

sassy-skank:

Jean Paul Gaultier Fall 2014-15 Collection

sassy-skank:

Jean Paul Gaultier Fall 2014-15 Collection

(via sarkos)